All My Sons

Who's Who

ANNETTE BENING (Kate Keller). Annette Bening is a Tony and Academy Award-nominated actress with a celebrated career across stage and screen. Theater credits include: King Lear for Public Theater’s 2014 Shakespeare in the Park; Ruth Draper Monologues at Geffen Playhouse; The Cherry Orchard at Mark Taper Forum; Talking Heads at Tiffany Theater; Hedda Gabler at Geffen Playhouse; and Medea at UCLA. Her work as Holly Dancer in Costal Disturbances earned her the 1987 Clarence Derwent Tony Award for Outstanding Debut Performance of the Season. Film credits include: Life Itself; The Seagull; Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool (BAFTA Award nomination); Rules Don’t Apply; 20th Century Women (Golden Globe and Independent Spirit Award nomination); Danny Collins; The Search; The Face of Love; Girl Most Likely; Ginger & Rosa; Ruby Sparks; The Kids are Alright (Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA Award, Independent Spirit Award nomination and SAG Award nomination); Mother and Child, The Women, Running with Scissors (Golden Globe nomination); Mrs. Harris (Golden Globe nomination); Being Julia (Academy Award, Golden Globe and SAG Award nomination); Open Range; What Planet Are You From?; American Beauty (Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA Award and SAG Award nomination); In Dreams; The Siege; Mars Attacks!, The American President (Golden Globe nomination); Richard III; Love Affair; Bugsy (Golden Globe nomination); Regarding Henry; Guilty by Suspicion; Postcards for the Edge; The Grifters (Academy Award and BAFTA Award nomination); Valmont; and The Great Outdoors. Her upcoming film credits include: Captain Marvel, Christoph Waltz’s directorial debut Georgetown; and William Nicholson’s Hope Gap opposite Bill Nighy. Bening graduated from San Francisco State University and trained at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco until she joined the acting company.
 
TRACY LETTS (Joe Keller) is the only person to win both a Tony Award for acting and a Pulitzer Prize. He is the author of Killer Joe, Bug, Man from Nebraska (Pulitzer finalist), August: Osage County (Pulitzer Prize, Tony® Award for Best Play), Superior Donuts, The Scavenger’s Daughter, Mary Page Marlowe, Linda Vista and The Minutes (Pulitzer finalist). He also wrote the screenplays for the films Killer Joe, Bug, August: Osage County, and, currently in production, The Woman in the Window. He won the 2013 Tony Award for Best Leading Actor in a Play for his performance as George in the Tony Award-winning revival of Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, which premiered at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre. He joined the Steppenwolf ensemble in 2002, where he has appeared in American Buffalo, Betrayal, The Pillowman, The Pain and the Itch, The Dresser, Homebody/Kabul, The Dazzle, Glengarry Glen Ross (also Dublin and Toronto), Three Days of Rain, many others. Other productions include The Realistic Joneses (Broadway) and Orson’s Shadow (Barrow Street Theatre, NY). Film appearances include The Post, Lady Bird, The Lovers, Indignation, Christine, The Big Short, Elvis and Nixon, Imperium, Wiener-Dog, Guinevere. TV appearances include The Sinner, Divorce, Homeland, Seinfeld, Home Improvement.
   
ARTHUR MILLER (Playwright). Miller (1915-2005) was born in New York City and studied at the University of Michigan. October 2015 marked the centenary of his birth. His plays include The Man Who Had All the Luck (1944), All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge and A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1964), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972), The Archbishop’s Ceiling (1977), The American Clock (1980) and Playing for Time (1980). Later plays include The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1994), Mr. Peters’ Connections (1998), Resurrection Blues (2002), and Finishing the Picture (2004). Other works include Situation Normal, reportage (1944), Focus, a novel (1945), The Misfits, a screenplay and a cinema novel (1961), and the texts for In Russia (1969), In the Country (1977), and Chinese Encounters (1979), three books in collaboration with his wife, photographer Inge Morath. Memoirs include ‘Salesman’ in Beijing (1984), and Timebends, an autobiography (1987). Short fiction includes the collection I Don’t Need You Anymore (1967), the novella, Homely Girl, a Life (1995) and Presence: Stories (2007). Essay collections include The Theater Essays of Arthur Miller (1978) and Echoes Down the Corridor: Collected Essays 1944 – 2000, as well as the individually published On Politics and the Art of Acting (2001). Among other honors, he received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1949 for Death of a Salesman.
 
JACK O'BRIEN (Director).